Tech-Tuesday – Meditation and Mindfulness Apps

Shining a spotlight on different technology services and applications that may be helpful for students, faculty, and staff here in the Penn Community!


It appears that mindfulness has become the hot new buzzword on campuses and on various blog sites across the country. This is with good reason! Practicing mindfulness has been shown to improve general health, reduce stress, improve immunity, and boost recovery. For college students, practicing mindfulness has been shown to reduce overall stress, reduce depressive symptoms, enhance focus, and improve overall grades (Ackerman, 2017).


While many of us may want to incorporate mindfulness practices into our daily lives, it can be difficult to make time in our schedule to read a book on mindfulness or to attend a meditation class. Luckily, there are a few apps that make it simpler to incorporate mindfulness into our daily routines! This blog will highlight two different applications that have helped me incorporate meditation and mindfulness into my weekly routine.


  1. Headspace (

The first is app is called Headspace (, and it has become quite popular. Headspace is great because it takes you through the meditation process if you are unfamiliar or new to the practice. The app has a beginner 10-day meditation guide that can be a great place to start! Each day leads you through a 10-minute meditation practice. It even incorporates tracking into the app to motivate you to stick with keeping mindfulness as a part of your daily routine.  The app is initially free to download, and then will take you through its app to purchase different meditation exercises.


   2.  Stop, Breathe, & Think (

Stop, Breathe, & Think ( is another great app to help you practice meditation and mindfulness (Full disclosure – this is the app I love and use most often). The app has short guided meditations, starting at just two minutes, that help you make time to breathe and check in with yourself throughout your hectic day. The app helps you learn how to meditate. You can then choose from a variety of sessions depending on what you need each day. The sessions include titles such as: Breathe, Gain Resilience, Connect with Your Body, Be Kind, Sleep, and Chill. (I highly recommend the Falling Asleep meditation in the Sleep session. It really helps me unwind at the end of the day, and has even helped me conquer some of my insomnia). While some parts of the app are free, other sessions require you to pay; however, 10% of the revenue go towards the nonprofit Tools for Peace, which helps at-risk youth experience the benefits of mindfulness and meditation. Knowing this, you can feel good about taking care of yourself while knowing you are helping to pay the gift of mindfulness forward!

These are just two of the many apps out there to help us practice self-care. What apps do you use? Do you have any you recommend?

This blog was based on information from the following sites:

By Staff Writer: Kelcey Grogan, WLRC Learning Instructor


Positive Psychology – Volunteer!


Taking time to volunteer

can help improve your mental health & wellbeing!


Positive Psychology strategies and techniques have shown to:

  • Reduce stress
  • Increase happiness
  • Correlate with increased college achievement 

It is important to approach volunteering in college differently than how we approached community service in high school or simply for the purpose of strengthening our resumes or applications:

  • It is about taking time out of our busy lives to offer our time, skills, or experience to help an organization on Penn’s campus or within the broader Philadelphia community.

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In terms of Positive Psychology, volunteering has been shown to improve people’s emotional wellbeing. 

Here are 3 suggestions for how to get involved here at Penn:
  1. Find volunteer opportunities! Here is a link to the Netter Center on Penn’s campus which works to establish partnerships with the broader Philadelphia community:


  1. Check out ABCS courses at Penn. “ABCS students and faculty work with West Philadelphia public schools, communities of faith, and community organizations to help solve critical campus and community problems in a variety of areas such as the environment, health, arts, and education.”
  2. Check out Penn’s Civic House:

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Have you found other ways to meaningfully engage with different organizations here on campus or within the Philadelphia community? Let us know!

By Staff Writer: Kelcey Grogan, Learning Instructor


Studying & The Super Bowl



  • Are you a diehard Eagles fan who has been waiting for a game like this since you were a kid?
  • Maybe you’re a bandwagon fan whose rooting for Philly now that you live here?
  • Or, perhaps you don’t care about football at all, but are planning to watch for the commercials and the halftime show, or maybe you just want to enjoy the snacks?

Whatever your association is with the Eagles, you won’t be able to escape talk of the game in Philadelphia this weekend. The Super Bowl can be a fun game to watch with your friends, especially since the Eagles will be representing this year!

However, the game does fall at a time in the semester when things start to get busy! Not to fear, Weingarten has some tips on how to manage and balance your time so that you can watch the big game AND stay on top of your school work!


  1. Make sure you review your schedule for next week as soon as possible. Make sure you note what assignments are due on Monday and Tuesday (not to jinx anything, but if the Eagles win, the parade will supposedly be on Tuesday). If you have any exams, essays, quizzes, or other work due at the end of the week, jot those down as well. Also note any work responsibilities or other commitments you have coming up.
  2. Use this information to create a to-do list for the weekend.
  3. From this to-do list, create a schedule for yourself for this weekend so that you can use your time efficiently before the game begins. Block out time for when you will work on each assignment. Be specific and strategic about what work you will complete when.
  4. Remember often people work best in approximately 1 hour blocks of time. Include a 5-10 minute break in this hour of work time. Also, it can be helpful to alternate assignments or subjects. For example, work for one hour on subject A, then work for one hour on subject B, then you can return to work on subject A for an hour.
  5. Perhaps you take it easy on Friday or Saturday night so that you can get some more work done on the other day and enjoy Sunday.
  6. Include some time in your schedule to learn the Eagles fight song if you haven’t already. Here’s a helpful link ! 
However you decide to spend your time, we hope you have a fun, SAFE, and enjoyable weekend!
And remember . . .



 By Staff Writer: Kelcey Grogan, Learning Instructor

Positive Psychology – Keep a Gratitude Journal


Positive Psychology is a new, exciting, and constantly developing field!

Positive psychology is the “science of positive subjective experience, positive individual traits, and positive institutions’ promises to improve quality of life and prevent the pathologies that arise when life is barren and meaningless” (Seligman & Csikszentmihalyi, 2014, p. 5).

Positive psychology has been shown to increase happiness and reduce stress

(Goodmon et al., 2016; McDermott et al., 2017).

At PENN, we have the Penn Positive Psychology Centre, which is doing incredible work in the field:

  • We are just beginning to understand how implementing positive psychology techniques can reduce stress, increase happiness, and improve achievement in college students.
  • While more research still needs to be done, early studies have shown that implementing positive psychology techniques have improved students’ mental well-being.


Keep a Gratitude Journal!
  • Gratitude journals are a way to keep track of the positive and good things in your life that you have to be grateful for.
  • In the hurried nature of our daily lives, it can be easy to lose track of all the things, big and small that we can appreciate and be thankful for.
  • A gratitude journal helps you slow down and reflect on the good things in your life.
  • Taking time to notice the positive things each day helps you keep a more positive outlook.


How to keep a gratitude journal?
  1. There is no right or wrong way to keep a gratitude journal. Do what works best for you.
  2. You can just use a plain notebook, or keep the list right in your diary or journal if you already use one. There are gratitude journals that you can buy that often come with prompts or different quotes to make you think, but buying one isn’t necessary.
  3. While you can keep write your entries in a way that is meaningful for you, it is recommended that people take time each night to write down 1-5 things you are grateful for each day.
  4. It is a helpful way to keep track of what went well that day, even on days that are stressful and feel like nothing went the way it was supposed to.
  5. Furthermore, writing in your gratitude journal can be a relaxing way to help people prepare for bed and can even make sleeping easier.


No matter how you use your gratitude journal, take some time to appreciate the people, places, and things in your life!

By Staff Writer: Kelcey Grogan, Learning Instructor


Goodmon, L. B., Middleditch, A. M., Childs, B., & Pietrasiuk, S. E. (2016). Positive psychology course and its relationship to well-being, depression, and stress. Teaching of Psychology, 43(3), 232–237.

McDermott, R. C., Cheng, H.-L., Wong, J., Booth, N., Jones, Z., & Sevig, T. (2017). Hope for help-seeking: a positive psychology perspective of psychological help-seeking intentions. The Counseling Psychologist, 45(2), 237–265.

Seligman, M. E. P., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2014). Positive psychology: An introduction. in M. Csikszentmihalyi (Ed.), Flow and the foundations of positive psychology: the collected works of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (pp. 279–298). Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands.

Seligman, M. E., Steen, T. A., Park, N., & Peterson, C. (2005). Positive psychology progress: Empirical validation of interventions. American Psychologist, 60, 410-421. doi:10.1037/0003066X.60.5.410

Work-Life Balance: 4 Suggestions for Optimizing Your Personal Time!


Wow! Spring semester is here and charging forward at full speed!
(I don’t know about you, but for me the winter break flew by!)

Now, the spring semester has kicked off, Canvas sites have been published, syllabi collected, books ordered, first classes attended, preliminary assignments completed, and first projects and/or exams scheduled…


It’s time to balance the semester workload with time to relax and recharge on your own and with friends.

Maybe you have weekend plans or you’re already planning your spring break, or maybe your plans are to squeeze in watching some of your favorite shows on TV or Netflix in-between studying.


We here at Weingarten have four suggestions for how to make the most out of your personal time while on campus in order to remain as relaxed, refreshed, and rejuvenated in the spring semester as possible:

1. Read a book that you want to read!


Often, during the semester, the only reading students have time to do are the readings that are assigned for classes. Use your scheduled and dedicated study breaks to read a book you have been wanting to read. So many wonderful books were published this year, check out these lists for some suggestions:

2. Write a thank you note!

thank you

Stay connected and send a thank you note or an email to a professor, staff member, friend, or classmate who was a big help to you last semester. Your kind words of appreciation will mean more than you know.

3. Plan your spring semester strategically!


Take an afternoon to lay out important dates on your calendar and planner for the spring semester.

4. Form an exercise habit!


With each new semester, it’s the perfect time to start building a new habit! Do you have plans this semester to walk each day or to go to the gym or to do yoga or to meditate each week? Do these plans fall to the wayside when the semester get busy? Exercising regularly is one of the best things we can do for our mind and body, but it can be easy to push these commitments to the side when the semester gets busy.

It takes three weeks to form a new habit and make it stick! 
No matter what your plans are, we hope you optimize your personal time while maintaining your work-life balance!

By Staff Writer: Kelcey Grogan, Learning Instructor

Shhh!!! Super Secret Study Spot!

secret-1142327_960_720 In need of a new study spot? 
Bored of the same old?
Search no more! 



If you are a sensory-modal, visual learner, and/or share a love for the arts,  you will love our newest Super Secret Study spot: UPENN-ICA

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Location: 118 South 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Phone: (215) 898-7108

Museum Hours: 

Elixir Coffee Bar: 

Admission: FREE for ALL


As soon as you walk into the ICA-UPENN, you will notice the essential Elixir Coffee Bar to your left:


Grab your favorite caffeine fuel or otherwise, gourmet pastry, and head up the stairs to your left alongside the mega glass walls to the museum’s mezzanine:


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Your long-awaited soft-landing will be a brightly-lit mezzanine area flooded in natural light from two adjacent walls:

Depending on the configuration of the space, you may find different types of table set-ups, but typically, you will have the option of at least 3 small tables with chairs on all sides, enough to support 1 person to a group of 3-4 people:



When the weather is nice outside, you can head out to the Tuttleman Terrace, and enjoy the elements:

Studying + Sunbathing = Bliss!

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So next time you find yourself needing a little pick-me-up, try a change of scenery…


  • Galleries are currently closed for installation, but the Elixir Coffee Bar and Mezzanine remain open regular hours.
  • Winter Opening Celebration: February 2, 2018.
  • Winter Exhibit:
Cary Leibowitz: Museum Show

large_20_CaryLeibowitz_2.3.17_JKAPhotography (2)

So grab your FREE ICA-UPENN Museum Membership, and enjoy your Super Secret Study Spot!

Secret Concept

Staff Writer: Min Derry, Learning Instructor

Starting Spring Semester Off Strong!


Welcome back to Philadelphia for the 2018 Spring Semester! We here at the Weingarten Learning Resources Center hope you had a relaxing and rejuvenating break. We also hope you remembered to bring back some warm clothes! It’s been a fairly chilly winter here so far – make sure you stay bundled up for your walks to class, work, and extra-curricular activities. With this weather, some of you may be even more encouraged to stay inside and get a jump start on your class work!

walnut walk

Whether this weather makes you want to head to the library or curl up under a blanket watching Netflix, the learning instructors at Weingarten have five steps to help make this semester the most successful and manageable one yet:

Step 1 – Reflect:

Before you dive into your new coursework, spend some time reflecting on last semester. You can simply mentally reflect, or devote some time to writing your answers down in a notebook or journal. Here are a few questions to guide your thinking:

  • How did you manage your time last semester?
  • How did you prepare for your exams and quizzes?
  • How did you approach long term projects or papers?
  • What worked for you? What didn’t work for you?
  • What would you like to be different this semester?


Step 2 – Set Goals:

Based on your reflections, set 1-3 small goals for yourself this semester. These goals should be manageable (you can achieve them in one semester), measurable (you will know when you achieved them), and reflective of what is most important for you and your studies. Write these goals down on a piece of paper and post them on your bulletin board, or place them in the first page of your planner. Put them somewhere you will see them often to remind yourself of what you are working towards.

goal setting

Step 3 – Make a Plan:

Spend some time in the beginning of the semester writing down all due dates for your exams, quizzes, papers and projects in your calendars and planners. Doing this now will save you time and prevent future headaches later. Remember time management has three components:

  1. Long term (semester) planning
  2. Weekly planner
  3. Daily To-Do Lists/Tasks & Daily Schedule

Make sure your time management plan includes all three of these components.

time to plan

Step 4 – Identify Resources You Can Use for Help:

Before you are crammed with work and crunched for time, spend an afternoon locating different resources on campuses that are here to support you. Make an appointment with a librarian so that you finally understand how to conduct research properly (it’s more than just entering search terms in Google!). Attend office hours with your professors or TAs before they become swamped with students. Make an appointment with us here at the Weingarten Resources Center. Schedule the doctor’s appointment that you have been meaning to go to. Seek out these resources now! Don’t wait until later in the semester. Here are some resources that can be useful for students:

  • The Tutoring Center
  • Weingarten Learning Resources Center
  • Marks Family Writing Center
  • Resource Librarians
  • Professor and TA Office Hours
  • CAPs, Health Center, Women’s Center
  • Campus and Community Houses (La Casa Latina, Makuu, Greenfield Intercultural Center, LGBT Center, etc.)
  • Your college major Advisors

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Step 5 – Attend a Session at the Weingarten Learning Resources Center:

To learn more about these ideas and other strategies, attend a session at the Weingarten Learning Resources Centers so that you work smarter not harder this semester!

fresh start

Whatever you need, Weingarten is here to support your academic growth! Remember we have walk-in hours every weekday from 12PM to 3PM and on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings from 4PM to 7PM in the Weingarten Learning Resources Center. You can also always call 215-573-9235 and schedule an appointment.

Have a great, happy, and successful spring semester!


By Staff Writer: Kelcey Grogan, Learning Fellow & Learning Instructor